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Shvoong Home>Books>Lorca-Dali. Love that Couldn''t Be Review

Lorca-Dali. Love that Couldn''t Be

Book Review   by:ddaluz     Original Author: Ian gibson
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This abstract was translated from Lorca-Dalí El Amor Que No Pudo Ser
 
Lorca-Dalí, Love that Couldn''t Be, provides us with a unprecedented and surprising view of the intimate friendship that joined two colossi of the 20th century''s Spain. Friendship that the very Dalí described, shortly before dying, as "tragic" (though erotic), not being able, as heterosexual - debatable opinion according to the author of this work -, physically correspond to the passion raised in the poet. Ian Gibson, who has had access to new documentation, draws in this book a masterful and subtle study of a relationship that was origin of a overpowering creativity, with crucial implications for the work - and life - of both friends. In view of this book, nobody can remain indifferent. Federico García Lorca and Eugenio Salvador Dalí lived their particular Brokeback Mountain in the Spain of the 1920s. It is one of the most fascinating and sad stories between two important characters of our cultural landscape. Their relationship went beyond simple friendship. They met in 1922 in The Students'' Residence in Madrid (aged 24 and 18 respectively). It was a great love story but never got consummated. Lorca, less fearful to eroticism, was much more aware of the love he felt for his friend. As soon as Lorca saw him he fell madly in love with Dalí, but the latter did not accept his homosexuality, among other things by the influence of a very harsh father, Figueres notary... According to the painter, in May 1926 the poet attempted to "physically be with him", wanted to penetrate him, and although Dalí felt flattered by Lorca''s love, he did not agree to his wishes, since he did not considere himself homosexual, something Lorca always respected deeply. This chapter, until recently one of the darkest in García Lorca''s life, almost as much as his death, has seen the light thanks to the Irish Ian Gibson, who had already written two biographies of these characters, and has used as the basis of this essay the letters Salvador Dalí referred to García Lorca. We must remember that Lorca''s family was not much in favor of airing his sex life. Absurd, if we think that the poet never hid it, in his life or in his work. For Gibson, perhaps someone has stolen them, so there is still hope that someday may appear. In these letters Dalí, little given to tenderness, writes truly romantic things to Federico. Dalí, in consecutive letters, told him his idea of writing a text identifying the image of San
Sebastián with the poet. Although love was never consummated, their respective
works came enriched from that relationship. The works of both are full of references to the other, holding a special fascination on the other. You cannot say that Lorca actively influenced on Dali''s work. However, although we cannot speak specifically of a "Dali''s Lorquian stage", Federico is very present in the paintings of that time; at least in twelve of his works Lorca''s head appears with himself. Let us remember one where their fused heads appear, or that one where the shadow of Dalí projects Lorca''s head. Ian Gibson''s book explains how Luis Buñuel, third vertex of this triangle, who despised Lorca, he called him "the disgusting", and saw their strong friendship with displeasure, did everything possible to remove the poet''s influence on the painter. In 1927, Buñuel, who had managed to unseat Lorca in Dali''s heart, takes him to Paris to perform together the surrealism masterpiece film
An Andalusian dog. Legend tells that due to a dog drawn in a letter to García Lorca in October-November, 1927, the "Andalusian dog" of the film makes reference to the Andalusian poet. Thus must have been understood by Lorca who, at the end of 1929, and apparently in response to "An Andalusian dog", wrote in New York the screenplay of Journey to the Moon. Although he handed a copy of it to the Mexican filmmaker Emilio Amero so he shot it, it did not finally become a film, and had to wait until 1998, year of his birth centenary, when another painter, Frederic Amat, could carry this project out . Like other Lorquian texts that emerged from that New York experience and have taken a long time to be able to be performed. In November 1927, Salvador Dalí published a prose, "My friend and the beach", in which cut off hands appear and an eye cut by a scalpel, and which bears the initial appointment "honey is sweeter than blood", title of the famous painting Dalí painted that year, and alludes to Lorca''s romantic inclination towards him. It has been suggested the possibility that, in the opposition raised by this picture title, "honey" appointed to Lorca and "blood" to Buñuel, on the basis of the confrontation between the two in terms of personality and poetics.
Published: April 19, 2012   
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