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Shvoong Home>Books>Pride and Prejudice Review

Pride and Prejudice

Book Review   by:MCorner     Original Author: Jane Austen
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It is universally known that five single sisters, with an overbearing mother, a nonchalant father and a village of gossips will be an interesting start to a story about love, class, marriage and honour in the late 18th century. Throw into that mixing pot, a young agreeable neighbour, his proud but decidedly rich handsome friend, a creepy man of the cloth and a charming but naughty soldier, all single and ready to be married off to the most deserving, and you have a chaotic race into relationships and society. However the most compelling of these is the development of the relationship between Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy, the dry wit and wicked observations made by the former is matched by the cynical humour of the latter. Austen weaves a magical story that really does seem to grow love out of hate. The romantic liaisons make the world palpable, Elizabeth’s search for love with and without interference from her mother, throw her into the clutches of two very different characters - The cleric who finds love in the end with her best friend and the soldier who lies and cheats his way into her sister's bed. In the end though only one man will do, and all it takes is a heartfelt confession, a beautiful house and a admission that perhaps indeed she had let her prejudice blind her own emotions. That said, the man improves like a fine wine through the age of the book, proving that love can turn you into a better man, woman or thing. Of course faults are not gone just accepted more and improved upon. This book is like a hot cup of tea on a cold rainy day, it finds you snuggled by the fireside, imagining dancing at the Netherfield Ball, wrapped in a world that isn't all cosy niceness but showing that even when the world is bitter you don't have to be.
Published: September 09, 2005   
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