Search
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Create a Shvoong account from scratch

Already a Member? Sign In!
×

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

OR

Not a Member? Sign up!
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

Shvoong Home>Books>Children & Youth>Cinderella Review

Cinderella

Article Review   by:Bloomsbury     Original Author: adaptation from The Brothers Grimm
ª
 
Disney’s fairytale Cinderella, an adaptation from the Grimm Brothers, has become re-popularized recently, along with other princess stories, as she is a character promoted for our youngest daughters to admire and emulate. I admit it has been quite a while since I actually read the story myself. Now that I have read it again, I would very willingly go out and buy my six-year old as much overpriced Cinderella merchandise as she wanted and still have a clear conscience. As parents have to work harder to provide for their children and states require rote performance over cherishing childhood, the character Cinderella offers all children that if they have a good character all of their dreams can come true. And characters that try to win by manipulation and a mean heart are always thwarted by “The End”. Cinderella is kind and always cheerful. She does not complain of her situation or compare herself to the sisters who take advantage of her. An additional admirable quality of Cinderella is her appreciation of nature. She loves the mice and birds who are her companions. When Cinderella has no gown for the ball, she does not complain or give up. Instead she is excited and industrious to create a beautiful gown out of scraps, employing the help of her special friends. Cinderella is always graciously thankful to those who help her along the way. And after her sister try to steal her place as true owners of the glass slipper, Cinderella patiently waits to approach the duke in a humble manner and offer to try on her glass slipper.
Cinderella’s stepsisters are selfish. They never miss an opportunity to be mean to her. The step-mother treats her like a slave. She makes Cinderella do chores almost as a punishment the she is not her own child. All of the step-sisters and stepmother are continuously taking advantage of her in making Cinderella do for them what they are too lazy to do themselves. They manipulate for pretty Cinderella to not be able to attend the ball by assigning her extra chores then tearing her dress apart. It is no wonder the Prince had not yet chosen a princess. As the King looks on to the young women attending the ball he is also dismayed and disappointed at the prospects. He soon exclaims, “I give up!” The King is looking for a “suitable wife” to be a young pretty girl with good character. It is Cinderella’s good character that enables her to face the diversity of her circumstances. See, Cinderella “always had faith in her dreams.” The King jumped for joy and the Prince and Cinderella lived happily ever after.
Published: April 10, 2006   
Please Rate this Review : 1 2 3 4 5
Translate Send Link Print
X

.