Search
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Create a Shvoong account from scratch

Already a Member? Sign In!
×

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

OR

Not a Member? Sign up!
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

Shvoong Home>Books>Children & Youth>The Velveteen Rabbit Review

The Velveteen Rabbit

Book Review   by:Moth     Original Author: Margery Williams
ª
 
This is a classic story of the power of love. At first the Rabbit is new and smart as he waits in the Christmas stocking to be discovered by his new owner, a small boy. As with many new toys, he is played with for a while, and then tossed into the cupboard with the rest of the out-of-favour toys. He gets to know the others and soon learns that he is really very lowly compared to them. Velveteen toys aren’t as good as mechanical toys, painted toys or expensive or handcrafted toys. The wise old Skin Horse befriends him. The Skin Horse explains about magic and being Real. Being Real isn’t how you are made or how much you cost, but about being loved so much by a child that you just, simply, become Real. The Skin Horse has been left in the nursery from a previous owner who had loved him and so he had became Real, and though not a favourite now, once Real, you are always Real. Being Real is something that the Velveteen Rabbit wants to become. Unfortunately there is no sign of the boy even remembering the Rabbit’s existence. But things can change. One night, the boy’s nurse gives him to the boy to cuddle, and from then on the boy hugs him and talks and plays with him, and the Rabbit grows to like this new friendship. He gets left outside and is by now torn, dirty and wet, but when the boy declares he is Real, and the Velveteen Rabbit is happier than ever.
In the nearby woods the Rabbit meets two woodland rabbits. They want him to come and play but he can’t because he is not real in the way that they are. The boy takes him home, but now he is feeling sad. The boy becomes ill, and his room is disinfected. The Rabbit is tossed in a sack with other worn-out and torn things and the sack is dumped outside. Remembering happier times, a tear trickles down the Velveteen Rabbit’s toy nose and a fairy comes, and takes him to play with the rabbits in the woods, where he discovers that she has made him real like them. He has fur instead of velveteen and legs that jump and run, and he makes new friends. Best of all, the boy sees him on a visit to the woods, and even thinks he looks a bit like his own, old toy rabbit. The story suggests an allegory of life, and of growing old and worn but with love. It has a poignancy and charm which has maintained its huge popularity since publication in 1922. The Velveteen Rabbit was the first and perhaps the best known of the author’s thirty books written for children.
Published: July 12, 2005   
Please Rate this Review : 1 2 3 4 5
Translate Send Link Print
X

.