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Shvoong Home>Books>How To & Self Help>The Use of Games and Songs in Teaching English-I Review

The Use of Games and Songs in Teaching English-I

Book Review   by:slawek4567     Original Author: Maria Sadowska
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INTRODUCTION In view of the fact that the sense is a significant tool during teaching grammar, it is imperative to contextualize any language rules tip. Songs are one of the most charming and ethnically prosperous resources that the teachers can easily use in verbal communication classrooms. Songs propose a change from habitual classroom actions. They are valuable resources to expand students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They can also be exercises to teach a variety of language matters such as sentence patterns, vocabulary, pronunciation, rhythm, adjectives, and adverbs. Learning English in the course of songs also affords a non-threatening ambiance for students, who usually are tense when speaking English in an official classroom location. Songs also give new insights into the objective traditions. They are the means in the course of which educational topics are presented successfully. While they supply genuine texts, they are inspiring. Prosodic features of the language such as stress, rhythm, intonation are presented through songs, thus from side to side using them the language, which is cut up into sequences of structural points, becomes an entire once more. There are many advantages of using songs in the classroom. Through using modern trendy songs, which youngsters well know, the teacher can meet the challenges of the teenage needs in the classroom. Because songs are extremely unforgettable and motivating, in many forms they may comprise an influential subculture with their own rituals. Furthermore, through using customary folk songs the support of the learners’ knowledge of the target culture can be broadened. Appropriately, chosen traditional folk songs have the twofold encouraging assault of beautiful tunes and appealing stories, in addition for many students- the added component of originality. Most songs, especially folk songs, go after a frequently repetitive verse form, with rhyme, and have a series of other discourse features, which make them easy to follow. In consequence, if preferred appropriately and adopted cautiously, a teacher should benefit from songs in all phases of teaching grammar. Songs may both be used for the presentation or the perform phase of the grammar class. They may support widespread and concentrated listening, and inspire resourcefulness and use of imagination in an undisturbed classroom ambiance.
Whereas selecting a song the teacher should take the age, interests of the learners and the language being used in the song into deliberation. To improve learner commitment, it is also advantageous to allow learners to take part in the selection of the songs. The latest concern of the foreign language teachers is to make the children use the language communicatively. After the realization of communicative competence, activities, or techniques that are task-oriented and that guide children to use the language imaginatively have gained significance. Games and problem-solving activities, which are task-based and have a purpose beyond the production of accurate speech, are the examples of the most preferable communicative activities. Such activities highlight not only the competence but also the performance of the learner. Nonetheless, they are the indispensable parts of a grammar lesson, since they reinforce a form-discourse match. In such activities, the attention is on the discourse context. Both games and problem-solving activities have a purpose. Games are organized according to rules, and they are enjoyable. Most games require choral responses or group works, whereas problem-solving activities (though they are structured) require individual response and creative solutions. Games and problem-solving activities are generally used after the presentation, in the practice part, because such communicative tasks can only be handled after mastering sufficient grammar and lexical points. Through well-planned games, learners can put into practice and internalize vocabulary, grammar, and structures extensively. Play and competition that are provided by games enhance the motivation of the young learners. They also reduce the stress in the classroom. At the same time as playing games, the learners’ attention is on the message, not on the language.
Published: June 19, 2007   
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