Search
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Create a Shvoong account from scratch

Already a Member? Sign In!
×

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

OR

Not a Member? Sign up!
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

Shvoong Home>Books>Poetry>Review on “the Scholar Gipsy” by Mathew Arnold Review

Review on “the Scholar Gipsy” by Mathew Arnold

Book Review   by:akso6o175     Original Author: Andy Kester Sawian
ª
 
‘The Scholar Gipsy’ is based on a story about a scholar who abandoned academic life to join a band of gipsies. The taken from ‘The Vanity of Dogmatizing’, an attack on scholasticism by J. Glanvil. The various places and landmarks mentioned in the poem are all actual ones situated around Oxford. The Shepherd is summoned to the hills to untie the wattled cotes: sheepfolds built of wattles or interwoven twigs; neither to leave his wistful flock unfed nor let his bawling fellows neither rack their throats nor allow the cropped grasses shoot another head. However, when the fields are calm and still and tired men and dogs all gone to rest, one can see only the white sheep cross the strips of the moon blanched green, the Shepherd must again renew the quest; the search for the Scholar Gipsy believed to be still haunting the vicinity.
The nook is screened over the high yet half reaped field and till the sun down will the narrator be peeping through the thick corn of the scarlet poppies. The round green roots and yellow stalks of pale pink Convolvulus; a flower; in tendrils creep, while the air-swept lindens yield their scent and rustle down their perfumed showers of bloom on the bent grass. The August sun with shade provides a beautiful view down to Oxford towers. The narrator read the story about the Oxford Scholar from the Glanvil’s Book about pregnant parts; inventive faculties; who got tired of knocking at the Preferment’s door and one summer morning forsook his friends and went to learn the Gipsy-lore. He roamed the world along with that wild brotherhood and never returned to Oxford again.
Still rumours hung around the country side that the lost scholar was seen straying the neighbourhood, by rare glimpses, pensive and tongue-tied folks. He wore a hat of antique shape and a grey cloak just like the gipsies do. Many Shepherds had met him on the hurst of spring at some secluded alehouse in the Berkshire moors on the warm ingle bench; bench in the chimney corner; the smock-frocked boors had found him seated as they entered. The Scholar Gipsy loved the retired ground the most. He met the Oxford riders, while they were returning home on the summer nights, at the ferry, after crossing the stripling Thames at Bab-lock-hithe. He trailed the cool stream with his wet fingers and the slow punt swings round; the Scholar Gipsy is seen reposing in a boat moored to the bank. The ‘punt’ or ferry boat is pulled across the stream by a rope, and the boat moves in a kind of curve. The rope ‘chops’ or suddenly shifts with the wind or the current; which leaned backwards in a pensive dream and fostering in his lap a heap of flowers plucked in shy fields and distant Wychwood bowers and his eyes resting on the moonlit stream. Above Godstow Bridge in the heat of June, men who returned from those wide fields of breezy grass, where the black winged swallows haunt the glittering Thames come to bathe at the abandoned lasher; pool below or dam, have often passed him by sitting upon the bank.
With scarlet patches tagged and shreds of grey; the bright-coloured and patched garments of the gipsies were hung on the bushes; above the forest ground of Thessaly, the black bird picks up its food, sees the scholar gipsy, but does not stop its meal nor fears him at all. So it often past him stray, rapt twirling a withered spray in his hand and waiting for the spark from heaven to fall. The line of festal light in Christ Church Hall; the dining hall at Christ Church College, Oxford; then sought his straw in some sequester grange. The Scholar Gipsy has not felt the lapse of hours nor the things that wears out the life of mortal men which exhaust the energy of strongest souls till having used their nerves with bliss and teen; sorrow; to the just pausing Genius; the spirit, both judge and protector, that accompanies a man throughout life.

All his store of sad experience he lays bare of wretched days; the intellectual king laying bare his ‘store of sad experience’ is contrasted with the scholar-gipsy distributing his ‘store of flowers’ to the maidens who danced around the Fyfield elm. On some wild pastoral slope emerge and resting on the moonlit pales; the stakes of a fence; freshens his flowers as in former years with dew or listen with enchanted ears from the dark dingles; wooded dells; to the nightingales. The Tyrian trader; associated with Carthaginian trading voyages (Carthage was founded as a Tyrian colony); lifting the cool-haired creepers stealthily, the fringes of a southward facing brow among the Aegean Isles. Outside the Western Straits and unbent sails, there were down cloudy cliffs through sheets of foam, the Shy traffickers; shy in their manner of trading rather than shy to trade; the dark Iberians come and on the beach undid his corded bales.

Published: October 08, 2010   
Please Rate this Review : 1 2 3 4 5
  1. Answer   Question  :    short summery of the poem scholar gipsy View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    Can someone just explain this poem in fairly simple terms? We just want to have a clue what is going on View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    what is the theme ? View All
Translate Send Link Print
X

.