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Shvoong Home>Books>Poetry>Review on “Waterloo” by Lord Byron Review

Review on “Waterloo” by Lord Byron

Book Review   by:akso6o175     Original Author: Andy Kester Sawian
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There was sound of revelry by night: A ball was given at Brussels on the evening before the battle of Quatre Bras, which occurred two days before the Battle of Waterloo; Belgium’s capital had then gathered her beauty and chivalry while her lamps shone brightly over fair women and brave men. The thousand hearts beat happily when the music arose with its voluptuous swell and all went out merry as though summoned to church by the wedding bells. Then suddenly a deep sound struck like a rising knell. It might be that no everyone heard it for the rest thought it to be the powerful movement of the wind or the rattling of a car over the stony street. Yet the patriots moved on with the dance and did not confine their joy nor did they sleep till morning. When the youth and their pleasure met to chase the glowing hours with flying feet, suddenly the heavy sound broke in once more and the clouds repeated its echo. The sound was felt coming nearer and deadlier than before. Finally it became all clear that it was the arm of the cannon’s opening roar.
The fated chieftain of Brunswick; Frederick William, Duke of Brunswick; sate: sat; within a windowed niche of the great high hall. He first heard the sound in the midst of the festival and immediately understood its tone to be caught up with death’s prophetic ear. When his people smiled because he deemed the roaring sound near, his heart knew more truly that pealed too well which stretched his father’s honour on a bloody bier. He also knew that it was only by rousing the vengeance blood alone that could quell his desire for ultimate justice. He rushed into the battlefield and died fighting in the forefront of the battle and unfortunately for his men who had to hurry to and fro. All his people gathered tears in their eyes and felt the trembling of distress with their cheeks all pale. Perhaps an hour ago, they blushed at the praise of their own loveliness when they had to experience the sudden partings like pressing the life out of young hearts and choking their sighs which might never be repeated. No one could guess if those mutual eyes should ever meet again, since upon the night that is so sweet should such an awful morning rise.
There was mounting on horsebacks in great haste. The steed in mustering squadron: gathering army; and the clattering car charged forward with impetuous speed and swiftly forming themselves into ranks of war. The deep thunder of canons peal on peal far and near while the beat of the alarming drums roused up the soldiers before the morning star came up. The citizens thronged and were dumb-struck with terror and whispering with white lips that the foe was coming. The wild and high note of the Cameron’s gathering: the war song of the Cameron clan; rose even on behalf of Lochiel: the Cameron clan is from Lochiel in Scotland; which was heard in the Albyn hills too; Albyn: a poetic name for Scotland; to have her Saxon foes: the English (since they belonged to Saxon stock while the Scots were mainly of Celtic origin). At mid-day and mid-night the Pibroch: a kind of Highland bagpipe; thrills with shrill and savage notes, whose breath fills their mountain pipes and the mountaineers too with the fierce native daring courage which instills the stirring memories of a thousand years and Evan, Donald: Evan Cameron and Donald Cameron, two Scottish chieftains who supported the Stuarts; fame rings in each clansman’s ears.
The Andennes: a large forest in Northern France, Belgium and Luxemburg; waves her green leaves above them. They pass by grieving the nature’s teardrop of dew. Over the un-returning brave patriots before the evening could be trodden like the grass which now lie beneath them but above shall grow in its next verdure this fiery mass of living vapour rolling on the foe and burning with high hope shall moulder cold and low. In the previous afternoon, they were full of lusty life and in the previous evening, they were happy and gay in beauty’s circle. However by midnight, it brought the signal sound of strife and by morning the men were marshaled in arms. The battle of the day was magnificently stern array. The thunder clouds sounded close over it which when rent, the earth is covered thick with other clay. The own clay of the earth shall cover, heap and pent: closely confined; the rider and horse, friend and foe in one red burial blent: blended i.e. lying together.

Published: October 12, 2010   
Please Rate this Review : 1 2 3 4 5
  1. Answer   Question  :    what is the theme of this poem? View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    what are the metaphors used in this poem? View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    what byron conveys to the reader in the poem the eve of waterloo ( 2 Answers ) View All
  1. Answer  :    The poet highlights the transistence of human life and fickleness of Fate as the young men and women enjoy themselves in the ball but they are unaware of the impending danger looming over their lives.Taken symbolically "Waterloo" can be referred to as the inevitable reality of the life. Wednesday, February 05, 2014
  1. Answer  :    The poet highlights the futility of the war.Byron wants to send a message to the world that no war can be justified. War is something that begins with a man’s ambition but ends with destruction on all sides. Thousands lose their lives and their homes, thousands go astray. There is no glory in war but only death and destruction. Byron has created an effect of shadowy unreality,which is constantly threatened by the fatal reality of warby contrasting the charms with the impending horrors of the war Wednesday, February 05, 2014
  1. Answer   Question  :    summary of the eve of waterloo View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    what are the figure of speeches in this poem ( 2 Answers ) View All
  1. Answer  :    Metaphor"Death's prophetic ears","fiercy mass of living valour" Simile- "o be trodden like a grass". Personification -"Beauty and Chivalry" "Youth and Pleasure meet" "Dewy with Nature's teardrops" :Beauty's circle" Wednesday, February 05, 2014
  1. Answer  :    personification Tuesday, August 27, 2013
  1. Answer   Question  :    summary of eve of waterloo View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    how the poem presents two constructive pictures of man View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    how the poem presents two constructive pictures of man? View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    how the poem presents two constructive pictures of man ?war and peace View All
  1. Answer   Question  :    expain how the poem presents two constructive picture of people?peace&war. View All
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  1. 3. jhakas

    english

    is this the poem itself??????????????

    2 Rating Wednesday, July 17, 2013
  2. 2.

    english

    short disjointed sentences could be expressed in more flowery language.

    3 Rating Monday, June 24, 2013
  3. 1.

    Eve of Waterloo

    Really helpful article. Although the part where nature sympathizes with the army, could be added. Otherwise, great review.

    2 Rating Thursday, May 09, 2013
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