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Shvoong Home>Science>Wave and wave motion Summary

Wave and wave motion

Article Summary   by:Dhaya     Original Authors: Michael nelon; Philip parker
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http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1459974Waves and Waves Motion
A wave allows energy to be transferred from one point to another Point but no particles move in the medium. We can notify the motion of the water wave in a pond which move the object on the surface of the pond but there are no motion in the particles of water. Wave length:- the distance between corresponding points in successive Wave forms. (Two successive crest or troughs)
frequency:- number of the vibration in a second Transverse and longitudinal waves
Transverse wave
In which wave motion direction of the oscillation is Perpendicular to the direction of the wave. and each particle having same frequency and amplitude. Examples:- waves on plucked strings, electromagnetic waves, light waves
Longitudinal wave:-in which wave motion, direction of the oscillation is same to the direction of the wave.
Example:- sound waves Basically, we can divide the wave into two main categories such as, Progressive waves Stationary or standing waves
Progressive waves This means that the wave profile moves along with the speed of the wave. That is, if a snapshot is taken of a progressive wave it repeats at Equal distances. the repeat distance is wave length. if one point is taken, profile is observed as it passes this point, then the profile is seen to repeat at equal intervals of time the repeat time is the period. the vibrations of the particles in a progressive wave are of the same amplitude and frequency. but the phase of the vibration changes for different points along the wave. Note - in a progressive wave the amplitude may be constant and neighboring points are out of phase with each other. Superposition
When two waves travel through a medium, their combined effect at any point can be found by the principle of the superposition. this states that the resultant displacement at any point is the sum of the separates due to the two points.
Stationary waves a stationary or standing wave is one in which some points are permanently at rest (nodes), others between these points are vibrating with varying amplitude and the maximum amplitude is midway between the nodes ( antinodes) points between successive nodes are in phase with each other. we can study motion of the string when a stationary wave is produced by using a stroboscope properties of the stationary waves Where the displacement is zero these points are called nodes of the stationary waves. At points between successive nodes the vibrations are in phase Each point along the wave has a different amplitude of vibration from neighboring points which have the greatest amplitude are called antinodes. The wave length is twice the distance between successive nodes or successive anti nodes.
Examples for stationary longitudinal wave. it can be set up in pipe closed at one end Examples for stationary transverse wave. it can be set up by plucking in middle a string fixed at both ends. properties of the waves
1. Reflection
2. Refraction
3. Diffraction
4. Interference

Published: September 10, 2007   
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  1. 1. yuha

    waves

    more important things are included here

    1 Rating Monday, September 10, 2007
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