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Shvoong Home>Science>Agronomy - Agriculture>Phosphate for More Agricultural Production Summary

Phosphate for More Agricultural Production

Article Summary   by:KhilendraBasnyat     Original Author: Khilendra Basnyat
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Phosphate for More Agricultural Production

Khilendra Basnyat

Phosphate is not less important for a particular plant since it helps develop the growth of the roots and tips of the plants in addition to making plants fruit bearings. It has been also realized that some soluble phosphate is often needed to give crops a good start. This can be achieved by partial acidulation of rock phosphate using less sulfuric acid than is needed for the ordinary superphosphate process.

In many developing countries where traditional cropping is pursued and also where land is being brought into cultivation, shortage of phosphate in soil is also one of the main factors limiting the production of larger crop yields. In these countries little or no phosphate was used in the past; even now the quantities applied are comparatively much less than in developed countries and in some countries virtually none is used. The function of phosphate in boosting agricultural production has been increasingly realized in many countries. In India, for example, efforts are being made to improve the phosphate status of the soil. In modern times, several kinds of phosphate fertilizers are used in India. Materials soluble in water are best on natural and alkaline soils phosphates that are insoluble in water are best on acid soils, and research is being done to improve the short-term low efficiency of soluble phosphate fertilizers. In general, no more than a quarter of phosphate applied is taken up by the first crop to be grown the other three quarters is fixed by the soil in relatively insoluble forms. Despite these residues usually benefit subsequent crop, their effect is small in relation to the direct effect of a fresh dressing. The use of special forms of phosphate and placement of dressing close to seed or roots should lead to improve direct effects. The costs of importing manufactured phosphate fertilizer or the necessary raw materials to make them are a serious obstacle to improving food production in developing .In fact, many countries have indigenous deposits of phosphate rock: however, these deposits are too small or too difficult for large-scale mining processing.

The International Fertilizer Development Centre has made some efforts to assess such local deposits and to devise ways of using them with maximum efficiency and at minimum cost for the benefit of local farmers. Research is also being done to determine what forms of phosphate may be least subject to fixation by acid tropical soils, which are usually rich in the forms of Iron precipitate in insoluble forms.

In the United States, phosphate rock is also used to furnish phosphorus to the soil. In this country, phosphate rock used for fertilizer is mined in the Tampa area. Florida is estimated to supply 80% of the phosphate used in the United States. Many of the rock phosphates found in developing countries are suitable for direct application after they have finely ground. However, many farmers of these countries have not been able to use them because of poor economic conditions.

Prospective development in world food supply and demand continue to be of great importance in a world in which almost half of the population live in countries that have less than $420 gross national product per capita. In these countries, most families allocate from 50 to 70% of their incomes in the acquisition of food. Most of the world’s poor live in rural areas and are directly or indirectly involved in the production of food and other agricultural production. Because the quality of the soil plays a significant role in boosting agricultural productions of a country, it is the crying need of the people of many countries to bring about improvement in the quality of the soil to reap benefits from their land.

Although Nepal is primarily agrarian in nature, the quality of the soil of this country on the average is not so good compared to other countries. In many parts of the country, the quantity of phosphate present in the soil is found to be less than the quantity actually needed. Because of this, agricultural production capacity has not increased to the same extent to which there has been an increase in investment. Since agricultural development of a country is based on the productivity of the soil of that country, it is necessary to add necessary quantity of phosphate to the soil of our country besides using other essential elements.


Published: April 19, 2012   
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