Search
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Create a Shvoong account from scratch

Already a Member? Sign In!
×

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

OR

Not a Member? Sign up!
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

Shvoong Home>Arts & Humanities>RP is disappearing Summary

RP is disappearing

Book Summary   by:dragonflysdance     Original Authors: John Wells; Urlike Altendorf
ª
 
The article stated that when journalists are running out of topics to write about they tend to reach for two themes A) that RP is disappearing B) that it is replaced by a new, potentially non-regional one. Both of these myths were further disproved. As far as RP disappearance is concerned author enrolled three following arguments. Firstly that non-RP are now found, secondly that there is decreasing number of RP speakers nowadays as those that would have acquired it no longer do so. Thirdly RP itself has changed acquiring forms that used to be perceived as local. As far as the second myth is concerned it is strictly connected with the notion of ‘Estuary English’. The term which was first used by non-linguists but then after being described by John Wells(1982) and Urlike Altendorf (1999) was introduced as a label for such English features that were characteristic for the lower middle-class accents of the Home Counties, the counties that surround London. The article also provides number of explanatory factors as to why ‘Estuary English ‘is perceived as new and coming thing. First one being that those who would have acquired RP no longer does so. The second reason is connected with upward social movement in the last twenty years that has resulted in people of middle-class background being on prominent positions. The third one is that some of ‘Estuary English’ phonological features are spreading now, just as London-based features used to do. In conclusion it is stated that ‘Estuary English’ will never replace RP and that it will always remain a regional accent with a rather large range.
Published: December 27, 2006   
Please Rate this Summary : 1 2 3 4 5
Translate Send Link Print
X

.