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Shvoong Home>Internet & Technology>Software>Common Os File System Structures Review

Common Os File System Structures

Academic Paper Review   by:PatriciaVasquez     Original Author: Patricia Vasquez
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Microsoft Vista uses the New Technology File System (NTFS).
The features of NTFS are:

  • File encryption allows you to protect files and folders from
    unauthorized access.
  • Permissions can be set on individual files, as well as on folders.
  • Disk quotas allow you to monitor and control the amount of disk
    space used by individual users.
  • Better scalability allows you to use large volumes. The maximum
    volume size for NTFS is much greater than it is for FAT. Additionally, NTFS
    performance does not degrade as volume size increases, as it does in FAT
    systems.
  • Recovery logging of disk activities helps restore information
    quickly in the event of power failure or other system problems.

Macintosh OSX uses the Hierarchical File System (HFS+). HFS+ is the
preferred file system on Mac OS X. It supports journaling, quotas, byte-range
locking, Finder information in metadata, multiple encodings, hard and symbolic
links, aliases, support for hiding file extensions on a per-file basis, etc.
HFS+ uses B-Trees heavily for many of its internals.


Linux uses the Virtual File System(VFS).
Linux VFS manages objects in the file system. Andries Evert Brouwer,
a Dutch mathematician and computer programmer, and a professor at Eindhoven
University of Technology (TU/e) states:


The main objects are: superblock, dentries,inodes, and files.
The kernel keeps track of files using in-core inodes ("index
nodes"), usually derived by the low-level file system from on-disk inodes.
A file may have several names, and there is a layer of dentries ("directory
entries") that represent pathnames, speeding up the lookup operation. Several
processes may have the same file open for reading or writing, and file structures
contain the required information such as the current file position. Access to a
file system starts by mounting it. This operation takes a file system type
(like ext2, vfat, iso9660, nfs) and a device and produces the in-core superblock that
contains the information required for operations on the file system; a third
ingredient, the mount point, specifies what pathname refers to the root of the file
system.


One of the features of Linux thatdiffers from Vista and Mac OSX is the ability to choose
different file systemssuch as ext2fs/ext3fs etcetera.
Linux also provides support for other OS file
systems and is scalable. Mac’s file permissions are modeled in the same format
as Linux. Read, write, and execute

permissions are assigned to group, user or other (anonymous). Vista has a more
restrictive level of file permissions by assigning unique permissions to each
individual user. This enables the administrator to assign permissions to a
specific group and choose to deny read, write, execute. Vista has additional
file permissions such as full control, modify, and special permissions.


An important feature is that all 3
file systems support is journaling. “Journaling file systems use a journal to
buffer changes to the file system (which is also used in crash recovery) but
can use different strategies for when and what is journaled.” Vista supports
RAID for redundancy whereas Mac does not support RAID. Apple supports Time
Capsule. “Time Capsule only has one hard drive, thus no RAID.” Linux new version
ZFS software based system now supports RAID.”



Works Cited

Amit Singh. (2003, December). Retrieved January 18, 2012, from Mac OSX
Internals: http://www.osxbook.com/book/bonus/ancient/whatismacosx/arch_fs.html


Apple Store for Business (U.S.). (2010, February 6).
Apple Store - Product Details.
Retrieved January 20, 2012, from Does it have RAID 1 Functionality?:
http://store.apple.com/us _smb_78313/question/answers/product/MD032LL /A?pqid=QHUJF7C7PXHXFPKXYT27CFH9DUFDPJ4D2


Brouwer,A. (2003, 0201).
The Linux Virtual File System. Retrieved 12 18, 2012, from The
Linux Kernal: http://www.win.tue.nl/~aeb/linux/lk/lk-8.html


M. Tim Jones, Consultant Engineer, Emulex Corp. (2008, June 04).
Anatomy of Linux Journaling Systems.
Retrieved January 20, 2012, from IBM developerWorks:
http://www.ibm.com/develo perworks/library/l-journaling-filesystems/index.html


MicrosoftTechNet.
(2012). File Systems. Retrieved January 18, 2012, from Windows Client
Tech Center: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766145(WS.10).aspx


O'Bee, K. (2012, January
21). Network Administrator, SAIC. (P. Vasquez, Interviewer)




Published: March 12, 2012   
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