Search
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Create a Shvoong account from scratch

Already a Member? Sign In!
×

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

OR

Not a Member? Sign up!
×

Sign up

Use your Facebook account for quick registration

OR

Sign In

Sign in using your Facebook account

Shvoong Home>Lifestyle>Food & Drink>The Truth About Vegetables Review

The Truth About Vegetables

Personal Experience Review   by:DrUnyereno    
ª
 
In the summer of 2012 psychologists Dr. Esther Wiltshire and Dr. Gemma Unyereno conducted an experiment in which various vegetables were made different emotional films. The selected vegetables were parsnips, brussel sprouts and aubergines. The movies shown helped to extract different emotions, the chosen movies were: Titanic (for sadness), The Fight Club (for anger), The Hangover (for comedy) and Snow White (for happiness). Each type of vegetable watched one of the chosen movies and they found that the vegetables became very emotional. A riot broke out during The Fight Club and many vegetables commited suicide after viewing Titanic. We can therefore conclude that vegetables do in fact have feelings. I believe that in response to this we should retreat the way we view these emotional beings. It would perhaps be more humane to keep them as pets or companions instead of horrifyingly killing them. A vegetable society is already being created to ensure their complete safety in the cruel harsh world that has been created.

Here is a section from the incorrect wikipedia page on Vegetables:

There are at least four definitions relating to fruits and vegetables:

  • Fruit (botany): the ovary of a flowering plant (sometimes including accessory structures),
  • Fruit (culinary): any edible part of a plant with a sweet flavor,
  • Vegetable (culinary): any edible part of a plant with a savory flavor.
  • Vegetable (legal): commodities that are taxed as vegetables in a particular jurisdiction

In everyday, grocery-store, culinary language, the words "fruit" and "vegetable" are mutually exclusive; plant products that are called fruit are hardly ever classified as vegetables, and vice-versa. The word "fruit" has a precise botanical meaning (a part that developed from the ovary of a flowering plant), which is considerably different from its culinary meaning, and includes many poisonous fruits. While peaches, plums, and oranges are "fruit" in both senses, many items commonly called "vegetables" — such as eggplants, bell peppers, and tomatoes — are botanically fruits, while the cereals (grains) are both a fruit and a vegetable, as well as some spices like black pepper and chili peppers. Some plant products, such as corn or peas, may be considered to be vegetables only while still unripe.

The question of whether the tomato is a fruit or a vegetable found its way into the United States Supreme Court in 1893. The court ruled unanimously in Nix v. Hedden that a tomato is correctly identified as, and thus taxed as, a vegetable, for the purposes of the Tariff of 1883 on imported produce. The court did acknowledge, however, that, botanically speaking, a tomato is a fruit.[8]

Languages other than English often have categories that can be identified with the common English meanings of "fruit" and "vegetable", but their precise meaning often depends on local culinary traditions. For example, in Brazil the avocado is traditionally consumed with sugar as a dessert or in milkshakes, and hence it is regarded as a culinary fruit; whereas in other countries (including Mexico and the United States) it is used in salads and dips, and hence considered to be a vegetable

Published: September 05, 2012   
Please Rate this Review : 1 2 3 4 5
Translate Send Link Print
X

.