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Shvoong Home>Social Sciences>Sociology>Subcultures Summary

Subcultures

Book Summary   by:radhi     Original Author: Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia
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Urban sociology is the sociological study of social life and human interaction in metropolitan areas. Like most areas of sociology, urban sociologists use statisticial analysis, observation, social theory, interviews, and other methods to study a range of topics, including migration and demographic trends, economics, poverty, race relations, economic trends, and etc. During the industrial revolution, sociologists such as Max Weber and Emile Durkheim focused on the increasing urbanziation of social life and the effects it had on people''s feelings of alienation and anonymity. The Chicago School is a major influence in the study of urban sociology. Many of their findings have been refined or rejected, but the lasting impact of the Chicago School can still be found in today''s teachings Important publications in urban sociology Rural sociology Urban culture Urban studies Urban tribe The New Urban Sociology Guy Ankerl, Urbanization Overspeed in Tropical Africa,Geneva: INUPRESS,1986 ISBN 2-88155-000-2. Mark Gottdiener, Ray Hutchison Westview Press, 2006. Description: Representing a major contribution to the field, authors Mark Gottdiener and Ray Hutchison present their breakthrough text in a new third edition, now completely revised and streamlined to provide students with a solid grounding on the topic. The book is organized around an integrated paradigm--the sociospatial perspective--which considers the role played by social factors such as race, class, gender, lifestyle, economics, culture, and politics on the development of metropolitan areas. New case studies throughout the text represent the most recent work in the field, as well as key terms and discussion questions at the end of each chapter. Additional updates include discussions of globalism, suburbanization, the multi-centered region as the new urban form, the new urbanism, and critical perspectives on planning and policy. Rural sociology From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Rural sociology is a field of sociology associated with the study of social life in non-metropolitan areas. More concisely, it is the scientific study of social arrangements and behaviour amongst people distanced from points of concentrated population or economic activity. Like any sociological discipline, rural sociology involves the examination of statistical data, interviews, social theory, observation, survey research, and many other techniques. In contrast to rural sociology, urban sociology is the study of urban social life. Agribusiness is one focus of rural sociology and much of the field is dedicated to the economics of farm production. Other areas of study include rural migration and other demographic patterns, environmental sociology, amenity-led development, public lands policies, so-called "boomtown" development, social disruption, rural health care and education polices, and etc. Urban culture is the culture of cities.
Cities all over the world, past and present, have behaviors and cultural elements that separate them from otherwise comparable rural areas. In the US and UK, "urban" is often used as a euphemism to describe hip hop culture or subsets of black culture; being these defined groups as a type of urban tribe. It can also refer to the greater availability of cultural resources (such as art, theatre, events, etc) as compared to suburban or rural areas. List of urban studies topics From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Urban studies) Jump to: navigation, search Urban Studies is the scientific discipline that studies all aspects of cities, their sus, and other urban areas. This includes urban economics, urban planning, urban architecture, urban ecology, urban transportation systems, urban politics, and urban social relations. This can be contrasted with rural areas and rural lifestyles. Urban tribe From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search An urban tribe is a subculture that originates and develops within urban environments (see urban culture). [edit] Description Urban tribes are groups of people in urban areas who have some kind of close association based upon similar lifestyles or activities. Subcultures, such as urban tribes, are more common in larger cities where the enormous size and complexity of the society create a sense of alienation or isolation on the level of the individual. This, in turn, can lead to the (official or unofficial) formation of urban tribes in which people effectively unite behind a common interest to create a smaller-scale community within a larger, overall society. Although the phrase urban tribe implies nothing about age or marriage, Ethan Watters defines urban tribes as groups of never-married''s between the ages of 25 and 45 who gather in common-interest groups and enjoy the urban lifestyle. Urban lifestyle communities offer a viable alternative to traditional family structures. The neologism urban tribe was coined in 2001 by Ethan Watters in a New York Times Magazine article, who later expanded upon the idea in his 2003 book Urban Tribes: A Generation Redefines Friendship, Family, and Commitment (ISBN 1-58234-264-4). Later on, the term would also be used to refer to people''s groups with a specific urban culture ( Example: hip hop culture, Gang, etc).
Published: June 14, 2007   
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