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Shvoong Home>Society & News>News Items>The Statesman Summary

The Statesman

Article Summary   by:Baidyanath    
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100th Birthdays may soon be the norm.

According to Mr. Shripad Tuljapurkar, a Stanford
University biologist, life expectancy may rise by 20 years
within the next decade by wide use of state-of-the-art,
anti-ageing technologies. This will change the global
demographics highly tilting the scales in favour of the
higher age groups. This advantage of higher life expectancy
may accrue to the rich nations only thanks to the cost and
affordability of the related drugs by those countries.

In a study presented to the AAAS (American Association
for the Advancement of Science) at St. Louis last Friday,
the biologist said that the new technology might enhance
the average age in industrialized nations to 100 years.

Mr. Aubey De Gray, a biologist at Cambridge University said
that middle-aged people could expect a 25 years increment
to their life for there was a 50 per cent chance of
developing appropriate anti-ageing therapies in the course
of the next couple of decades.

But as in the case of application of all new technologies,
this also has a darker side. The gap between rich and
poorer nations might widen because of the application of
anti-ageing therapies. The International community would
also be required to find ways to solve the consequent
social and socio-economic pressures generated by additional
life expectancies.
Published: February 22, 2006   
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