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Shvoong Home>Society & News>News Items>Times of India Summary

Times of India

Article Summary   by:anil ekbote    
ª
 
India’s anti-farmer policies, influenced by the World Bank, are putting
Indian farmers in deep crisis. In the last ten years of trade liberalisation
150,000 farmers have committed suicide. The World Bank’s economists don’t
acknowledge this.

The World Bank coerced India into monoculture practices
and promoted chemical addiction. The
Bank provided credit to introduce capital intensive agricultural model. Along
with USAID and exerted pressure to encourage foreign investment in India’s
fertiliser industry, liberalise imports and remove domestic controls on
importing fertilisers, seeds and pesticides for all of which the Bank gave
credit.

The World Bank gave two National Seed Projects loans to develop
infrastructure and create state institutions for increasing seed production.
Yet another loan from the World Bank saw India’s seed industry become more
market responsive. A special objective of these loans was the involvement of
private sector including multinational corporations. This enabled he entry of
seed corporations like Monsanto. Today, most of the farmers’ suicides are
precisely in those areas where Monsanto seeds have spread. Monsanto is taken to the court for its
monopolistic practices. Such practices by corporations caused increase in price
of wheat. The farmers now earn less and the poor pay more for food. World Bank
pressurised to dismantle the country’s public distribution system and liberalise
fertiliser imports, de-regularise domestic production and distribution of
fertilisers, remove land ceiling regulations, remove subsidies on irrigation,
electricity, credit and cooperatives, facilitate trading of canal irrigation
water rights, deregulate wheat, rice, sugarcane, edible oil, cotton and oilseed
industry and dismantle food security system.

World Bank is asking India
to focus not on food grains but on export crops like flowers and shrimps.
Export crops have already led to land conflicts in Punjab.
The corporate hijack of retail and global agriculture are adding to the woes of
Indian farmers and people.
Published: June 22, 2007   
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